Can the hydronium ion theoretically form a H4O^2+ ion?

A water molecule has two electronegative centers around the two non-bonding pairs of electrons it contains. In a hydronium ion (H3O^+), one of those electron pairs forms a coordinate covalent bond with a proton. Couldn't the other electron pair do the same thing, forming a H4O^2+ ion? If so, why did we never learn about this in chemistry? If not, why?
 
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1,819 IKU
Posted on Jul. 2nd, 2008

H3O+ is actually theoretical so theorectically speaking it could form an H4O^2+ ion but that would be pushing the other electron pair in a way it doesn't want to go.

Source:
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem03/chem03510.htm

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